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J Hepatol. 1999 Dec;31(6):1080-5.

Albumin dialysis: effective removal of copper in a patient with fulminant Wilson disease and successful bridging to liver transplantation: a new possibility for the elimination of protein-bound toxins.

Author information

1
II. Department of Internal Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Germany. Bernhard.Kreymann@lrz.tum.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acute liver failure may be the first manifestation of Wilson disease. If copper elimination fails, liver transplantation is the only remaining therapeutic option. Albumin dialysis, a new method for the removal of protein-bound toxins, was performed in a patient with fulminant Wilson disease.

METHODS:

An 18-year-old man with Wilson disease presented with hyperacute liver failure, hepatic encephalopathy III, oligo-anuric renal failure, haemolytic anaemia, rhabdomyolysis, pancreatitis and thrombocytopenia. He was treated with albumin dialysis using a 44 g/l albumin-containing dialysate and a slow dialysate flow rate (1-2 l/h). The other details of the technique used are similar to routine continuous veno-venous haemodiafiltration.

RESULTS:

One hundred and five milligrams of copper were removed by albumin dialysis within the first six treatments, resulting in normalisation of blood-copper levels. Successful treatment of the multiorgan failure was achieved. Hepatic encephalopathy improved within 2 days. The patient initially refused liver transplantation. Therefore 35 additional albumin dialysis treatments were performed. Forty-three grams of bilirubin (an indicator of detoxified substances in the liver) and 196 mg of copper were removed. Multiorgan failure, in particular hepatic encephalopathy, did not recur during 59 days of treatment. Eventually, the patient agreed to liver transplantation and that was successful.

CONCLUSION:

Albumin dialysis is a new method for the effective treatment of fulminant Wilson disease, resulting in the removal of protein-bound toxins copper and bilirubin. It may serve as a new treatment option in hyperacute liver failure of other origin, acting as an extracorporeal detoxifier.

PMID:
10604583
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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