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J Neurophysiol. 1999 Dec;82(6):3417-22.

Interactions between GABA and glycine at inhibitory amino acid receptors on rat olfactory bulb neurons.

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1
Department of Biological Science, Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4340, USA.

Abstract

Whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to examine interactions between GABA and glycine at inhibitory amino acid receptors on rat olfactory bulb neurons in primary culture. Membrane currents evoked by GABA and glycine were selectively inhibited by low concentrations of bicuculline and strychnine, respectively, suggesting that they activate pharmacologically distinct receptors. However, GABA- and glycine-mediated currents showed cross-inhibition when the two amino acids were applied sequentially. Application of one amino acid inhibited the response to immediate subsequent application of the other. In the majority of neurons, GABA inhibited subsequent glycine-evoked currents and glycine inhibited subsequent GABA-evoked currents. In a small proportion of neurons, however, GABA inhibited glycine-evoked currents but glycine had little effect on GABA-evoked currents. The reverse was true in other neurons, suggesting that alterations in chloride gradients alone did not account for the cross-inhibition. Furthermore, no cross-inhibition was observed between GABA- and glycine-evoked currents in some neurons. The amplitude of the current evoked by the coapplication of saturating concentrations of GABA and glycine in these neurons was nearly the sum of the currents evoked by GABA and glycine alone. In contrast, the currents were not additive in neurons demonstrating cross-inhibition. These results suggest that olfactory bulb neurons heterogeneously express a population of inhibitory amino acid receptors that can bind either GABA or glycine. Interactions between GABA and glycine at inhibitory amino acid receptors may provide a mechanism to modulate inhibitory synaptic transmission.

PMID:
10601472
DOI:
10.1152/jn.1999.82.6.3417
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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