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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1999 Nov;181(5 Pt 1):1087-91.

Delivery of the marginally preterm infant: what are the minor morbidities?

Author information

1
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to determine frequencies of minor morbidities associated with delivery between 32 and 36 weeks' gestation.

STUDY DESIGN:

The study population consisted of all infants delivered between 32 and 36 weeks' gestation at a tertiary care hospital during 1997. Maternal and neonatal charts were abstracted for maternal history, pregnancy complications, and neonatal demographics comparing complications present at each gestational week. The Student t test, chi(2) analysis, and stepwise regression analysis were used to assess statistical significance. Odds ratios were calculated.

RESULTS:

There were 553 patients eligible for study. There was increased risk of neonatal intensive care unit admission with delivery before 34 weeks' gestation (P <.04). An increased incidence of feeding difficulties was present before 35 weeks' gestation (P <.001). Hypothermia remained more frequent until 35 weeks' gestation (P <.05). Delivery at 35 weeks' gestation did not increase the mean number of neonatal hospital days.

CONCLUSION:

Although the incidences of major morbidities decline after 32 weeks' gestation, minor morbidities continue up to 35 to 36 weeks' gestation and may lengthen neonatal hospitalization.

PMID:
10561623
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9378(99)70086-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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