Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Contraception. 1999 Jul;60(1):15-24.

The effect of one injection of Depo-Provera on the human vaginal epithelium and cervical ectopy.

Author information

1
Contraceptive Research and Development Program (CONRAD), Arlington, Virginia 22209, USA.

Abstract

Two studies in rhesus monkeys have shown that progesterone implants, Depo-Provera and Norplant, were associated with vaginal thinning. Progesterone implants have also been associated with an increased risk of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) acquisition. This study in 16 women was done to assess vaginal epithelial thickness and number of cell layers from biopsies taken in the untreated follicular and luteal phases, and at 1 month and 3 months after administration of Depo-Provera. There was no significant change over time in either parameter from biopsies obtained in the luteal phase compared with those at either time after Depo-Provera administration. There was also no change in the mean number of Langerhans cells in vaginal wall specimens and no change in cervical ectopy. It appears that women do not respond to exogenous progestins with the dramatic vaginal thinning seen in rhesus monkeys.

PIP:

This study assesses vaginal epithelial thickness and number of cell layers from biopsies taken in the untreated follicular and luteal phases and at 1 month and 3 months after administration of Depo-Provera. Subjects were seen at the CONRAD Clinical Research Center at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia. Findings showed that there was no significant change over time in either parameter from biopsies obtained in the luteal phase compared with those at either time after Depo-Provera administration. There was also no change in the mean number of Langerhans cells in vaginal wall specimens and no change in cervical ectopy. The dramatic vaginal thinning seen in rhesus monkeys was not observed among these subjects.

PMID:
10549448
DOI:
10.1016/s0010-7824(99)00058-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center