Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am Psychol. 1999 Oct;54(10):805-16.

Racism as a stressor for African Americans. A biopsychosocial model.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. rclark@sun.science.wayne.edu

Abstract

Various authors have noted that interethnic group and intraethnic group racism are significant stressors for many African Americans. As such, intergroup and intragroup racism may play a role in the high rates of morbidity and mortality in this population. Yet, although scientific examinations of the effects of stress have proliferated, few researchers have explored the psychological, social, and physiological effects of perceived racism among African Americans. The purpose of this article was to outline a biopsychosocial model for perceived racism as a guide for future research. The first section of this article provides a brief overview of how racism has been conceptualized in the scientific literature. The second section reviews research exploring the existence of intergroup and intragroup racism. A contextual model for systematic studies of the biopsychosocial effects of perceived racism is then presented, along with recommendations for future research.

PMID:
10540593
DOI:
10.1037//0003-066x.54.10.805
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Psychological Association
Loading ...
Support Center