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Cancer Lett. 1999 Oct 18;145(1-2):115-20.

Elimination of Na+-dependent bile acid transporter from small intestine by ileum resection increases [correction of increase] colonic tumorigenesis in the rat fed deoxycholic acid.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Resource Chemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University, Japan. kanamoto@kpu.ac.jp

Erratum in

  • Cancer Lett 2000 Jun 30;154(2):217. Seki T [corrected to Saeki T].

Abstract

Ileal Na+-dependent bile acid transporter (ISBT) constituting a gateway to enterohepatic circulation of bile acids occurs exclusively at the distal site of the small intestine. In the present study, we examined colonic tumorigenesis promoted by deoxycholic acid in relation to the expression of the ISBT. For this purpose, the small intestine of a Fischer-344 rat was resected a length of 20 cm above the ileo-cecal valve (ileal resection) or below the duodenum (jejunal resection). Then, rats were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of azoxymethane (15 mg/kg body wt.) once a week for 3 weeks and fed a 20% casein diet supplemented with 0.2% deoxycholate for 39 weeks. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the ISBT mRNA was hardly detectable in ileum-resected rats. The excretion of fecal bile acids was 1.5-fold higher in the ileum-resected group than in the jejunum-resected group (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the serum bile acids concentration of ileal-resected rats was about one-half of that of jejunum-resected animals (P < 0.05). The tumor incidence and the total tumor number were significantly higher in the ileum-resected group than in the jejunum-resected one (P < 0.05). Interestingly, no tumor was found at the proximal colon in the jejunum-resected group while tumors developed frequently at the proximal site as well as mid and distal colon in the ileum-resected group. These observations demonstrate that malabsorption of bile acids owing to the lack of ISBT enhanced colon tumorigenesis.

PMID:
10530778
DOI:
10.1016/s0304-3835(99)00240-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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