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Vet Parasitol. 1999 Oct 1;86(3):203-15.

Ivermectin disposition kinetics after subcutaneous and intramuscular administration of an oil-based formulation to cattle.

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1
Departamento de Fisiopatología, Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias, Universidad Nacional del Centro, Campus Universitario, Tandil, Argentina.

Abstract

Slight differences in formulation may change the plasma kinetics and ecto-endoparasiticide activity of endectocide compounds. This work reports on the disposition kinetics and plasma availability of ivermectin (IVM) after subcutaneous (SC) and intramuscular (IM) administration as an oil-based formulation to cattle. Parasite-free Aberdeen Angus calves (n = 24; 240-280 kg) were divided into three groups (n = 8) and treated (200 microg/kg) with either an IVM oil-based pharmaceutical preparation (IVM-TEST formulation) (Bayer Argentina S.A.) given by subcutaneous (Group A) and intramuscular (Group B) injections or the IVM-CONTROL (non-aqueous formulation) (Ivomec, MSD Agvet) subcutaneously administered (Group C). Blood samples were taken over 35 days post-treatment and the recovered plasma was extracted and analyzed by HPLC using fluorescence detection. IVM was detected in plasma between 12 h and 35 days post-administration of IVM-TEST (SC and IM injections) and IVM-CONTROL formulations. Prolonged IVM absorption half-life (p < 0.05) and delayed peak plasma concentration (p < 0.001) were obtained following the SC administration of the IVM-TEST compared to the IVM-CONTROL formulation. No differences in total plasma availability were observed among treatments. However, the plasma residence time and elimination half-life of IVM were significantly longer after injection of the IVM-TEST formulation. IVM plasma concentrations were above 0.5 ng/ml for 20.6 (CONTROL) and 27.5 days (IVM-TEST SC), respectively (p < 0.05). The modified kinetic behaviour of IVM obtained after the administration of the novel oil-based formulation examined in this trial, compared to the standard preparation, may positively impact on its strategic use in cattle.

PMID:
10511102
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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