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Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek. 1999 May;75(4):351-9.

Adhesion and surface-aggregation of Candida albicans from saliva on acrylic surfaces with adhering bacteria as studied in a parallel plate flow chamber.

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1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Adhesive interactions between Candida albicans and oral bacteria are generally thought to play a crucial role in the microbial colonization of denture acrylic, which may lead to denture stomatitis. This study investigated the influence of saliva on the adhesive interactions between C. albicans and Streptococcus sanguis or Actinomyces naeslundii on denture acrylic. First, bacteria were allowed to adhere to the acrylic surface from a flowing suspension, and subsequently yeasts were flowed over the acrylic surface. The organisms were assayed in the presence or absence of human whole saliva. All experiments were carried out in a parallel plate flow chamber and enumeration was done in situ with an image analysis system. In the absence of adhering bacteria, adhesion of C. albicans from buffer was more extensive than from saliva. However, in the presence of adhering bacteria, yeast adhesion from saliva was increased with respect to adhesion of yeasts from buffer, indicating that specific salivary components constitute a bridge between bacteria and yeasts. In all cases, yeast aggregates consisting of 3 to 5 yeast cells were observed adhering to the surface. A surface physico-chemical analysis of the microbial cell surfaces prior to and after bathing the microorganisms in saliva, suggests that this bridging is mediated by acid-base interactions since all strains show a major increase in electron-donating surface free energy parameters upon bathing in saliva, with no change in their zeta potentials. The surface physico-chemical analysis furthermore suggests that S. sanguis and A. naeslundii may use a different mechanism for adhesive interactions with C. albicans in saliva.

PMID:
10510723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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