Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1999 Sep;83(3):208-11.

Comparison of emergency room asthma care to National Guidelines.

Author information

1
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark 07103-2499, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines were first released in 1991. To date there have been no studies published comparing them with actual care given.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to compare the documented care given in the emergency room (ER) of an urban tertiary care hospital with 1991 NAEPP guidelines.

METHODS:

A total of 1858 urban emergency room records with a diagnosis of asthma or reactive airway disease were recovered in 1 year (9/95 to 8/96) from pediatric and adult patients seen in the ER. Ten percent (n = 181) of the charts were reviewed for documentation of history, assessment of severity of attack, treatment given, and disposition.

RESULTS:

History of present attack was documented consistently in all age groups. Nocturnal symptoms were noted in 11%, and frequency of beta agonist use in 38% of the charts. Previous ER visits, hospitalization, ICU admissions, and intubations (HCUM) were documented in 70%. Accessory muscle use was recorded in 76% of the infants and 21% of the adults. Peak flows were obtained in 31% of children and 64% of adults. Steroids were given in the ER in 59% of infants, 83% of children, and 49% of adults. Pediatric patients were referred to their primary care provider 90%, and to pulmonary or allergy clinic 4% of the time. Adults were referred to allergists or pulmonologists 32% of the time.

CONCLUSION:

There are significant differences in ER evaluation and treatment when compared with the 1991 NAEPP guidelines. Differences also exist between various age groups within the same institution.

PMID:
10507264
DOI:
10.1016/S1081-1206(10)62641-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center