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Endoscopy. 1999 Aug;31(6):452-5.

"Missed" upper gastrointestinal tract lesions may explain "occult" bleeding.

Author information

1
Dept. of Hepatogastroenterology and Pancreatology, Erasmus Hospital, Free University of Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS:

Enteroscopy has been shown to be an effective diagnostic method in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the small bowel are the most common lesions discovered at enteroscopy. However, bleeding lesions may still be detected in the upper gastrointestinal tract even in patients who have previously undergone esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The aim of this study was to focus on these "missed" upper gastrointestinal lesions.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A retrospective review was conducted of all enteroscopic examinations carried out in patients with suspected gastrointestinal bleeding or overt gastrointestinal bleeding treated at our institution between 1993 and 1997. All patients had previously undergone an esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The push enteroscope (Olympus XSIF-100) was used in all of them.

RESULTS:

Push enteroscopy was performed in 233 patients (124 men and 109 women; mean age 63). A suspected bleeding lesion was observed in 53 % of the cases. AVMs represented 63% of the detected lesions. "Missed" upper gastrointestinal lesions were described in 25 patients (10.2 %). In half of these cases, the lesion was located in the upper part of the fundus. Wirsungorrhagia was the cause of bleeding in two cases.

CONCLUSIONS:

The study confirmed that push enteroscopy is an effective method of detecting lesions responsible for occult gastrointestinal bleeding. In this study, the overall diagnostic yield was 53%. In 10% of the patients, the lesion was located in the upper gastrointestinal tract, despite an initial esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The lesions were mainly located in the fundus. Although it is a rare condition, Wirsungorrhagia must be considered in patients with occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

PMID:
10494684
DOI:
10.1055/s-1999-151
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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