Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Biol Psychiatry. 1999 Sep 15;46(6):850-5.

Salivary cortisol and serum prolactin in relation to stress rating scales in a group of rescue workers.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rescue service personnel are often exposed to traumatic events as part of their occupation, and higher prevalence rates of psychiatric illness have been found among this group.

METHODS:

In 65 rescue workers, salivary cortisol at 8 AM and 10 PM and serum prolactin at 8 AM were related to the psychiatric self-rating scale General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) measuring psychiatric health, and the Impact of Events Scale (IES) and Post Traumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS) measuring posttraumatic symptoms.

RESULTS:

Seventeen percent of the study population scored above the GHQ-28 cut-off limit but none scored beyond the cut-off limit in the IES and PTSS questionnaires. Salivary cortisol concentration at 10 PM correlated with statistical significance to anxiety (p < .005) and depressive symptoms (p < .01) measured with GHQ-28, as well as to posttraumatic symptoms, with avoidance behavior measured with IES (p < .01) and PTSS (p < .005). Two of the rescue workers were followed over time with the same sampling procedure after a major rescue commission.

CONCLUSIONS:

The correlation between evening salivary cortisol and anxiety, depressiveness, and posttraumatic avoidance symptoms indicates that these parameters can be used in screening and follow-up after traumatic stress events.

PMID:
10494455
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center