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Am J Ophthalmol. 1999 Jul;128(1):81-7.

The influence of ocular pulsatility on scanning laser Doppler flowmetry.

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1
Discoveries in Sight, Devers Eye Institute, Portland, Oregon, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine the effect of the cardiac cycle on scanning laser Doppler flowmeter measurements of retinal capillary blood flow in rhesus monkeys and humans.

METHODS:

Multiple scanning laser Doppler flowmetry images of rhesus monkey and human retinal capillary blood flow over a range of heart rates were obtained. Average flow values were determined for the 64 scan lines that compose the two-dimensional flow map. Cutaneous blood flow was measured simultaneously with a laser Doppler flowmeter. The temporal relationships between retinal capillary blood flow, peripheral arterial pulse, and cutaneous blood flow were determined. In addition, human retinal capillary blood flow in a 10 x 10-pixel area during different phases of the cardiac cycle was compared.

RESULTS:

Regular oscillations in human and rhesus monkey retinal capillary blood flow are evident as alternating bright and dark horizontal bands in scanning laser Doppler flowmetry images. These fluctuations are temporally correlated with cutaneous blood flow. Linear regression of actual vs predicted heart rate based on peaks in retinal capillary flow yielded r = 0.999 in a rhesus monkey and 0.938 in a human. Retinal capillary blood flow in a 10 x 10-pixel area fluctuated as much as 50% depending on the phase of the cardiac cycle.

CONCLUSIONS:

The alternating bright and dark banding pattern observed in scanning laser Doppler flowmetry scans of retinal capillary blood flow is related to the cardiac pulse. The errors introduced by pulse-related fluctuations in retinal capillary blood flow are significant and must be minimized or corrected for accurate and reproducible measurements of ocular hemodynamics.

PMID:
10482098
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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