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J Vasc Surg. 1999 Sep;30(3):417-25.

Impact of race on the treatment for peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

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1
Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of race on the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and to examine the role of access to care and disease distribution on the observed racial disparity.

METHODS:

The study was performed as a retrospective analysis of hospital discharge abstracts from 1992 to 1995 in 202 non-federal, acute-care hospitals in the state of Florida. The subjects were patients older than 44 years of age who underwent major lower extremity amputation or revascularization (bypass grafting or angioplasty) for PAOD. The main outcome measures were incidence of intervention, incidence per demographic group, multivariate predictors of amputation versus revascularization, multivariate predictors of amputation versus revascularization among those patients with access to sophisticated care (hospital with arteriographic capabilities), and multivariate predictors of surgical bypass graft type (aortoiliac vs infrainguinal).

RESULTS:

A total of 51,819 procedures (9.1 per 10,000 population) were performed for PAOD during the study period and included 15,579 major lower extremity amputations (30.1%) and 36,240 revascularizations (69.9%). Although the incidence of a procedure for PAOD was comparable between African Americans and whites (9.0 vs 9.6 per 10, 000 demographic group), the incidence of amputation (5.0 vs 2.5 per 10,000 demographic group) was higher and the incidence of revascularization (4.0 vs 7.1 per 10,000 demographic group) was lower among African Americans. Furthermore, multivariate analysis results showed that African Americans (odds ratio, 3.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.34 to 4.30) were significantly more likely than whites to undergo amputation as opposed to revascularization. The secondary multivariate analyses results revealed that African Americans (odds ratio, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.58 to 3. 33) were more likely to undergo amputation among those patients (n = 9193) who underwent arteriography during the procedural admission and to undergo infrainguinal bypass grafting (odds ratio, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.48 to 2.71) among those patients (n = 27,796) who underwent surgical bypass grafting.

CONCLUSION:

There is a marked racial disparity in the treatment of patients with PAOD that may be caused in part by differences in the severity of disease or disease distribution.

PMID:
10477634
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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