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Clin Rheumatol. 1999;18(4):308-12.

Low back pain and posture.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Celal Bayar University School of Medicine, Manisa, Turkey.

Abstract

This study was designed to analyse postural aberrations of the back and lower back region in patients with acute and chronic low back pain and to investigate the accordance of clinical and radiological assessments. Fifty patients with acute and 50 with chronic low back pain and 50 controls were studied and a detailed spinal physical examination was performed. In addition, the angles of thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sacral inclination were assessed radiologically. Differences among the three groups, correlations of radiological parameters with each other and with clinical parameters such as age, gender and body mass index, and the accordance of clinical and radiological postural assessments were investigated. It was concluded that there were no statistically significant differences among the groups for angles of thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis and sacral inclination; however, we found significant correlations among all radiological parameters, especially between lumbar lordosis and sacral inclination. Both lumbar lordosis and sacral inclination were increased with body mass index, and lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis were increased with age. Clinical assessments of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis were not in accordance with radiological assessments.

PMID:
10468171
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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