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J Asthma. 1999 Aug;36(5):467-73.

Circadian variation in exhaled nitric oxide in nocturnal asthma.

Author information

1
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, and The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and shows a circadian variation with nocturnal exacerbations. Because exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) measurement appears to be a noninvasive marker of airway inflammation, we examined the hypothesis that ENO would increase at night. In five nocturnal and five non-nocturnal asthmatics, ENO was measured at 4 P.M., 10 P.M., and 4 A.M. before and after bronchodilator. Both pre- and post-bronchodilator ENO (mean pre- and post-bronchodilator +/- SEM, ppb) unexpectedly fell significantly in nocturnal asthma from 4 P.M. (77.2 +/- 8.2) compared to 10 P.M. (68.4 +/- 8.7, p < 0.003) and 4 A.M. (66.0 +/- 8.5, p < 0.001) with no significant difference between 10 P.M. and 4 A.M.. In contrast, there were no significant differences in mean ENO at 4 P.M., 10 P.M., and 4 A.M. in non-nocturnal asthma. (51.3 +/- 10.8, 57.7 +/- 13.4, 53.8 +/- 12.5 ppb, respectively). Following bronchodilator, ENO rose significantly by 10.5 +/- 1.8 ppb in the nocturnal asthma group alone. The circadian rhythm of ENO differed greatly between nocturnal and non-nocturnal asthma. The significant decrease in ENO in nocturnal asthma may reflect an important chronobiological defect in the endogenous production and/or increased disposition of nitric oxide, which in view of its bronchodilator action, could play a role in nocturnal exacerbations of asthma.

PMID:
10461936
DOI:
10.3109/02770909909087289
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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