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Contraception. 1999 Apr;59(4):253-6.

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding emergency contraception among nurses and nursing students in two hospitals in Nairobi, Kenya.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Nairobi, Kenya. medmicro@ken.healthnet.org

Abstract

A cross-sectional descriptive study on knowledge, attitudes, and practice about emergency contraception (EC) was conducted among nurses and nursing students using a self-administered questionnaire. One-hundred-sixty-seven qualified nurses and 63 nursing students completed the questionnaire. Over 95% listed at least one regular contraceptive method but only 2.6% spontaneously listed EC as a contraceptive method, whereas 48% of the respondents had heard of EC. Significantly more nursing students than qualified nurses were familiar with EC. Knowledge about the types of EC, applications, and side effects was poor and 49% of the respondents considered EC as an abortifacient. Of those familiar with EC, 77% approved its use for rape victims and 21% for adolescents and schoolgirls. Only 3.5% of all respondents had personally used EC in the past, 23% of those familiar with EC intend to use it in the future, whereas 53% intend to provide or promote it. The view that EC was abortifacient negatively influenced the decision to use or provide EC in the future. The present findings suggest that the level of knowledge of EC is poor and more information is needed. These findings indicate the potential to popularize emergency contraception in Kenya among nurses and nursing students.

PIP:

A descriptive research study on knowledge, attitudes and practices with regard to emergency contraception (EC) was conducted using a questionnaire among 167 nurses and 63 nursing students in Nairobi, Kenya. Results revealed that 95% recorded at least one regular contraceptive method. About 48% of the respondents had heard about EC, but only 2.6% had used it. More nursing students than qualified nurses were aware of EC. There was poor knowledge about the types, applications and side effects of EC. Some 49% of the subjects regarded EC as an abortifacient. About 77% of those knowledgeable about EC approved its use for rape victims and 21% for adolescents and schoolgirls. Only about 3.5% had personally used it. Some 23% of those aware of EC intended to use it in the future. About 53% planned to provide or promote it. The perception that EC is abortifacient affected the decision whether to use or provide it. The data imply that there is potential for effective promotion of EC among nurses and nursing students in Kenya.

PMID:
10457870
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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