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BMJ. 1999 Aug 21;319(7208):490-3; discussion 494.

Open randomised trial of intermittent very low energy diet together with nicotine gum for stopping smoking in women who gained weight in previous attempts to quit.

Author information

1
Obesity Unit, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. tobias.danielsson@medhs.ki.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether attempts to prevent weight gain will increase success rates for stopping smoking.

DESIGN:

16 week, open, randomised study with 1 year follow up.

SETTING:

Obesity unit.

SUBJECTS:

287 female smokers who had quit smoking before but started again because of weight concerns.

INTERVENTION:

Combination of a standard smoking cessation programme with nicotine gum and a behavioural weight control programme including a very low energy diet. A control group was treated with the identical programme but without the diet.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Sustained cessation of smoking.

RESULTS:

After 16 weeks, 68/137 (50%) women had stopped smoking in the diet group versus 53/150 (35%) in the control group (P=0.01). Among these women, weight fell by mean 2.1 (95% confidence interval 2.9 to 1.3) kg in the diet group but increased by 1.6 (0.9 to 2.3) kg in the control group (P<0.001). After 1 year the success rates in the diet and control groups were 38/137 (28%) and 24/150 (16%) respectively (P<0.05), but there was no statistical difference in weight gain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Combining the smoking cessation programme with an intervention to control weight helped women to stop smoking and control weight.

PMID:
10454403
PMCID:
PMC28202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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