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Pediatr Dent. 1999 Jul-Aug;21(4):242-7.

Sequelae and prognosis of intruded primary incisors: a retrospective study.

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1
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to assess the sequelae and prognosis of intruded primary incisors.

METHODS:

Of 196 children who visited the emergency clinic due to intrusion of 310 maxillary primary incisors, 110 children (172 teeth) were available for follow-up examination (study group). Eighty-six children (138 teeth) did not show for the follow-up examination (non-respondents group). Male/female ratio was 1.7:1. Age range of children at time of injury was 12-72 months (mean 28). Follow-up time ranged between 0 and 59 months (mean 27).

RESULTS:

Fifty-seven percent of all teeth were completely intruded. In 80%, the root was pushed labially. All but two ankylosed teeth re-erupted, and 37% of these re-erupted into an ectopic position. Completely intruded incisors re-erupted into an ectopic position in a higher percentage (45%) than partially intruded teeth (30%). Fifty-two percent of the teeth presented pulp canal obliteration (PCO). Sixty-four percent of the completely intruded incisors presented PCO compared to 40% of partially intruded teeth. Arrest of dentin apposition was found in 15% of the teeth, and was not affected by the degree of intrusion. Twenty-three teeth were extracted shortly after the injury due to suspect of contact with the developing permanent successor (19 teeth) and severe caries (4 teeth). Sixty-eight percent of the intruded teeth survived more than 36 months after the injury. Twenty-three percent were extracted due to periodontal breakdown and 5% due to repeated trauma. Antibiotic therapy did not have any effect on the survival rate.

CONCLUSION:

The majority of intruded primary incisors may re-erupt and survive with no complications after more than 36 months post trauma even in cases of complete intrusion and fracture of the labial bone plate.

PMID:
10436478
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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