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J Appl Microbiol. 1999 Jul;87(1):148-57.

Laboratory-scale inactivation of African swine fever virus and swine vesicular disease virus in pig slurry.

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1
Silsoe Research Institute, Bedford, UK. claire.turner@bbsrc.ac.uk

Abstract

Two methods were evaluated for the inactivation of African swine fever (ASV) and swine vesicular disease (SVD) viruses in pig slurry: chemical treatment and heat treatment. The addition of NaOH or Ca(OH)2 at different concentration/time combinations at 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C was examined, as was virus stability at different temperature/time combinations. ASF virus (ASFV) was less resistant to both methods than SVD virus (SVDV). In slurry from one source, ASFV was inactivated at 65 degrees C within 1 min, whereas SVDV required at least 2 min at 65 degrees C. However, it was found that thermal inactivation depended on the characteristics of the slurry used. Addition of 1% (w/v) of NaOH or Ca(OH)2 caused the inactivation of ASFV within 150 s at 4 degrees C; 0.5% (w/v) NaOH or Ca(OH)2 required 30 min for inactivation. NaOH or Ca(OH)2 (1% (w/v)) was not effective against SVDV at 22 degrees C after 30 min, and 1.5% (w/v) NaOH or Ca(OH)2 caused inactivation of SVDV at both 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C. At higher chemical concentrations or temperatures, ASFV and SVDV inactivation was faster in slurry than in buffered medium.

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