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Drug Metab Dispos. 1999 Aug;27(8):916-23.

Metabolism and excretion of atorvastatin in rats and dogs.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics, and Metabolism, Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research Co., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA.

Abstract

Atorvastatin (AT) is a second-generation potent inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, clinically approved for lowering plasma cholesterol. Using a mixture of [D(5)/D(0)] AT and/or [(14)C]AT, the metabolic fate and excretion of AT were examined in rats and dogs following single and multiple oral doses. Limited biliary recycling was examined in one dog after a single dose of AT. AT-derived metabolites in bile samples were identified by metabolite screening of the [D(5)/D(0)] AT molecular clusters using tandem mass spectrometry. Bile was a major route of [(14)C] drug-derived excretion, accounting for 73 and 33% of the oral dose in the rat and dog, respectively. The remaining radioactivity was recovered in the feces; only trace amounts were excreted in urine. Radioactive components identified in rat and dog bile were the para- and ortho-hydroxy metabolites, a glucuronide conjugate of ortho-hydroxy AT, and unchanged AT. Two minor radioactive components were identified as beta-oxidation products of AT with one confirmed as a beta-oxidized AT derivative. The reappearance of AT and major metabolites in bile from a dog administered a sample of its previously excreted bile indicated biliary recycling is an important component in AT metabolism. Multiple dose administration in rats did not alter biliary metabolic profiles. Rat and dog plasma profiles after multiple dose administration were similar and showed no additional metabolites not found in bile. Examination of rat and dog bile and plasma indicates that AT primarily undergoes oxidative metabolism.

PMID:
10421619
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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