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Jpn Heart J. 1999 Mar;40(2):109-18.

Morphological effects on in-stent restenosis assessed by intravascular ultrasound imaging.

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1
First Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, Japan.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rupture and dissection of the vessel wall immediately after balloon dilatation by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and to predict restenosis in patients who underwent subsequent coronary stent implantation. Stent implantation improves the long-term results of coronary angioplasty by reducing lesion elastic recoil and arterial remodeling. However, several studies have suggested that neointimal hyperplasia is the cause of instant restenosis. We recruited 60 patients in whom IVUS studies were performed immediately after successful balloon dilatation and just before stent implantation. We compared IVUS parameters with 6-month follow-up quantitative coronary angiography. This was performed in 51 lesions of 51 patients (85%). Qualitative analysis included assessment of plaque composition, plaque eccentricity, plaque fracture and the presence of dissection. In addition, minimal luminal diameter, percent diameter stenosis, percent area stenosis and plaque burden were quantitatively analyzed. Two morphological patterns after balloon dilatation were classified by IVUS. Type I was defined as absence or partial tear of the plaque without disclosure of the media to lumen (22 lesions). Type II was defined as a split in the plaque or dissection of the vessel wall with disclosure of the media to the lumen (29 lesions). At 6 months follow-up, angiographic restenosis occurred in 17 of the 51 lesions (33%). Restenosis was significantly (p < 0.05) more likely to occur in type II (13/29: 45% incidence) than in type I (4/22: 18% incidence). The assessment of plaque morphology immediately after balloon dilatation and before stent implantation provides important therapeutic and prognostic implications.

PMID:
10420872
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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