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Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 May;53 Suppl 2:S72-7.

A four week residential program for primary health care patients to control obesity and related heart risk factors: effective application of principles of learning and lifestyle change.

Author information

1
Department of Social Medicine, University of Umeå, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the short and long-term effectiveness of a four week residential program for primary health care patients to control obesity and related risk factors for cardio-vascular disease (CVD), especially blood pressure (BP).

DESIGN:

Prospective clinical study, with follow up after 1 and 5 y.

SETTING:

Vindeln Patient Education Centre, Vindeln, and Department of Social Medicine, University of Umea, Sweden.

SUBJECTS:

Approximately 2500 individuals, with two or more of the traditional risk factors for CVD, participated in the program. This report describes a subsample of 100 consecutive patients, 52+/-9 y, 53 men, with obesity and/or high BP.

INTERVENTION:

Four week residential program with lectures and group discussions as well as practical sessions in smaller groups (meal preparations, physical exercise, etc). The patients were followed-up medically in their home area.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Weight and blood pressure.

RESULTS:

Dramatic reductions of weight and, especially, of blood pressure (BP) occurred during the residential weeks, and the reductions were pronounced also after 1 y. After 5 y, the total mean weight among men with initial BMI > or = 30 kg/m2 was still 5 kg lower, and diastolic and systolic BP among those with hypertension was 15 and 20 mm Hg lower, respectively, than before the program.

CONCLUSIONS:

The full-time participation in the residential program and the enrollment and commitment of the patients may explain the clinical outcome. A level of predisposition greater than that required of most weight- and BP-control programs was confirmed and a great preventive or therapeutic potential was indicated. The study illustrates an effective application of the Precede-Proceed model of health promotion planning.

PMID:
10406442
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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