Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Kidney Dis. 1999 Jul;34(1):14-20.

Effect of aminoglycoside use on residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients.

Author information

1
Division of Renal Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USA. douglas_shamin@brown.edu

Abstract

Residual renal function (RRF) is a major contributor to total solute clearance in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, and maintenance of RRF has been linked to decreased morbidity and mortality in PD. There have been few clinical studies examining the impact of factors that potentially affect RRF in PD. This is a prospective observational study that examines the effects of parenteral aminoglycosides, a common nephrotoxin in the general population, on RRF in a cohort of PD patients. Seventy-two patients from two Rhode Island PD units were observed over 4 years. Twenty-four-hour renal creatinine clearances and urine volumes were measured every 4 to 6 months. The patients were divided into three groups, depending on exposure to peritonitis and aminoglycoside use. Group I included patients without peritonitis who received no intravenous (IV) or intraperitoneal (IP) antibiotics. Group II included patients with peritonitis who received IV or IP penicillins, cephalosporins, vancomycin, or quinolones, but no aminoglycosides. Group III included patients with peritonitis who received IV or IP aminoglycosides for at least 3 days. Patients in group III had a more rapid decline in renal creatinine clearance (-0.66 +/- 0.58 mL/min/mon) than groups I and II (P < 0.005) and had a more rapid decline in daily urine volume (-74 +/- 62 mL/d/mon) than groups I and II (P < 0.01). We conclude that IV or IP aminoglycosides seem to increase the rapidity of decline in RRF in PD patients. In patients with solute clearance dependent on RRF, it seems reasonable to withhold aminoglycosides, especially if other antibiotics are available and appropriate.

PMID:
10401010
DOI:
10.1053/AJKD03400014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center