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Trends Genet. 1999 Jul;15(7):273-7.

Cell fate and organogenesis in bacteria.

Author information

1
Departments of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology, Beckman Center, B300, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5329, USA. luttman@cmgm.stanford.edu

Abstract

Intercellular signaling through the Notch receptor and its ligands leads to the spatial differentiation of cell fate in vertebrates and invertebrates. In Myxococcus xanthus, fruiting-body development requires the transmission of a cell-bound intercellular signal by the protein called C-factor, which is functionally equivalent to the eukaryotic Notch ligands. Functional parallels between these two signaling systems include strong positive and negative feedback, and a consequent role in spatial differentiation. Consideration of these parallels enables us to make testable experimental predictions about Notch and C-signaling.

PMID:
10390626
DOI:
10.1016/s0168-9525(99)01740-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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