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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1999 Jul;160(1):33-9.

The effect of exposure to ozone and nitrogen dioxide on the airway response of atopic asthmatics to inhaled allergen: dose- and time-dependent effects.

Author information

1
Academic Department of Respiratory Medicine, St. Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London Chest Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Eleven mild atopic asthmatic patients were exposed for 6 h, in randomized order, to air, 100 ppb O3, 200 ppb NO2, and 100 ppb O3 + 200 ppb NO2, followed immediately by bronchial allergen challenge. Subsequently 10 of these patients were exposed for 3 h to air, 200 ppb O3, 400 ppb NO2, and 200 ppb O3 + 400 ppb NO2, followed immediately by bronchial allergen challenge. All exposures were carried out in an environmental chamber, with intermittent moderate exercise, and a minimal interval of 2 wk. Exposure for 6 h to 100 ppb O3, 200 ppb NO2, and 100 ppb O3 + 200 ppb NO2 did not lead to any significant increase in the airway response of these individuals to inhaled allergen, when compared with exposure for 6 h to air. In contrast, exposure for 3 h to 200 ppb O3, 400 ppb NO2, and 200 ppb O3 + 400 ppb NO2 significantly decreased the dose of allergen (in log cumulative breath units [CBU]) required to decrease FEV1 by 20% (allergen PD20FEV1), compared with exposure to air (geometric mean CBU: 3.0 for air versus 2.66 for O3 [p = 0.002]; 2.78 for NO2 [p = 0. 018]; 2.65 for O3 + NO2 [p = 0.002]). These results suggest that the pollutant-induced changes in airway response of mild atopic asthmatics to allergen may be dependent on a threshold concentration rather than the total amount of pollutant inhaled over a period of time.

PMID:
10390376
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.160.1.9808119
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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