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Cell Immunol. 1999 Jun 15;194(2):178-85.

The role of B cells in the establishment of T cell response in mice infected with an intracellular bacteria, Listeria monocytogenes.

Author information

1
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London, W12 0NN, United Kingdom. matsuzak@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp

Abstract

To clarify the role of B cells in the establishment of T cell response against intracellular bacteria, B-cell-deficient (muMT-/-) mice were infected with an intracellular bacteria, Listeria monocytogenes, and T cell response against the bacteria was analyzed. On day 6 of primary Listeria infection, spleen T cells of the muMT-/- mice showed significantly lower levels of proliferative response and IFN-gamma production than those of normal infected mice after in vitro stimulation with listerial antigen. Even in the secondary Listeria infection after immunization with viable bacteria, spleen T cells of the muMT-/- mice proliferated and produced IFN-gamma against listerial antigen at significantly lower levels than those of normal immunized mice. These results demonstrate participation of B cells in priming of Listeria-specific T cells in vivo. However, B cells failed to present Listeria antigen to Listeria-specific T cells in vitro unless Listeria antigen was solubilized. Furthermore, transfer of immune serum from Listeria-infected normal mice failed to enhance the Listeria-specific T cell response of muMT-/- mice. The results indicate that B cells support the T cell response against intracellular bacteria through a mechanism other than their Ig production or antigen presentation function.

PMID:
10383820
DOI:
10.1006/cimm.1999.1503
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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