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J Altern Complement Med. 1999 Jun;5(3):237-43.

A controlled investigation of bodywork in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 28223, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether a course of Feldenkrais bodywork would result in significant improvement in physical, mood symptoms and functioning in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients beyond the effects observed using a sham condition (nontherapeutic bodywork).

DESIGN:

The bodywork method used was the Feldenkrais method. Subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups in a crossover design to control for order effects of treatment. Half of the subjects received 8 weeks of sham sessions followed by 8 weeks of Feldenkrais sessions. The other half of the subjects received Feldenkrais sessions first and then sham. All subjects completed the outcome measures prior to the first course of treatment, in between Feldenkrais and sham, and at study completion.

SETTING:

Participants were recruited from a regional MS clinic and were administered bodywork treatment and outcome measures in a bodywork practitioner's office.

SUBJECTS:

Twenty individuals with clinically definite MS and disability status scores between 2.0 and 6.0 participated.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Nine-hole pegboard test of hand dexterity, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, MS self-efficacy scale, MS Symptom Inventory, MS Performance Scales, and the Perceived Stress Scale.

RESULTS:

The only significant differences were observed for perceived stress and lowered anxiety after Feldenkrais sessions. There were nonsignificant trends toward higher self-efficacy after both Feldenkrais and sham sessions. MS symptoms, levels of functional ability, and upper extremity performance were not affected by Feldenkrais or sham sessions.

PMID:
10381247
DOI:
10.1089/acm.1999.5.237
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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