Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Urol. 1999 Jul;162(1):113-8.

Correlates of dissatisfaction with treatment in patients with prostate cancer diagnosed through screening.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We evaluated correlates of patient reported dissatisfaction with treatment of prostate cancer detected by screening.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We performed a cross-sectional retrospective study to evaluate the correlates of dissatisfaction with treatment in 1,651 patients in whom prostate cancer was detected through serial screening. We included demographic and clinical characteristics in the independent and control variables, and we validated measurements of quality of life outcomes.

RESULTS:

Overall 11% of patients were dissatisfied with the treatment received. Differences in the rates of dissatisfaction with treatment were not statistically significant across treatment groups (11% for retropubic radical prostatectomy, 21% for perineal radical prostatectomy, 14% for radiotherapy, 8% for observation, 8% for hormonal treatment and 4% for cryoablation, p = 0.1). Patient age, race, followup interval, marital status, education and co-morbid conditions were not significant correlates of dissatisfaction with treatment (for all characteristics p> or =0.05). Urinary function and bothersomeness were associated with dissatisfaction with treatment (p<0.0001), whereas sexual function and bothersomeness were not (p>0.05). Multivariate analysis revealed that urinary function and bothersomeness were also the only significant correlates of dissatisfaction with treatment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Of patients in whom prostate cancer was detected by screening 11% were dissatisfied with treatment. Urinary function and bothersomeness were the only important correlates of dissatisfaction.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center