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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1999 Jun 22;96(13):7490-5.

Silibinin decreases prostate-specific antigen with cell growth inhibition via G1 arrest, leading to differentiation of prostate carcinoma cells: implications for prostate cancer intervention.

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1
Center for Cancer Causation and Prevention, AMC Cancer Research Center, 1600 Pierce Street, Denver, CO 80214, USA.

Abstract

Reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels has been proposed as an endpoint biomarker for hormone-refractory human prostate cancer intervention. We examined whether a flavonoid antioxidant silibinin (an active constituent of milk thistle) decreases PSA levels in hormone-refractory human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells and whether this effect has biological relevance. Silibinin treatment of cells grown in serum resulted in a significant decrease in both intracellular and secreted forms of PSA concomitant with a highly significant to complete inhibition of cell growth via a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Treatment of cells grown in charcoal-stripped serum and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone showed that the observed effects of silibinin are those involving androgen-stimulated PSA expression and cell growth. Silibinin-induced G1 arrest was associated with a marked decrease in the kinase activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and associated cyclins because of a highly significant decrease in cyclin D1, CDK4, and CDK6 levels and an induction of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 followed by their increased binding with CDK2. Silibinin treatment of cells did not result in apoptosis and changes in p53 and bcl2, suggesting that the observed increase in Cip1/p21 is a p53-independent effect that does not lead to an apoptotic cell death pathway. Conversely, silibinin treatment resulted in a significant neuroendocrine differentiation of LNCaP cells as an alternative pathway after Cip1/p21 induction and G1 arrest. Together, these results suggest that silibinin could be a useful agent for the intervention of hormone-refractory human prostate cancer.

PMID:
10377442
PMCID:
PMC22113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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