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Neuroepidemiology. 1999;18(4):194-202.

Association of cigarette smoking with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Author information

1
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA. kamel@niehs.nih.gov

Abstract

We explored the relationship between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and cigarette smoking in a case-control study conducted in New England from 1993 to 1996. Recently diagnosed ALS cases (n = 109) were recruited from two major referral centers. Population controls (n = 256) were identified by random telephone screening. Data were analyzed by logistic regression. After adjusting for age, sex, region and education, ever having smoked cigarettes was associated with an increase in risk for ALS (odds ratio 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.0-2.8). Average cigarettes smoked per day, years smoked and pack-years were all greater in cases than controls, but dose-response trends were not observed. Similar numbers of cases and controls had ever used alcohol, and only a small, nonsignificant association of drinks per month with ALS was observed. The association of cigarette smoking with ALS was not affected by adjusting for alcohol use. In contrast, the weak relationship of ALS with alcohol use was apparently due to confounding by smoking.

PMID:
10364720
DOI:
10.1159/000026211
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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