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Clin Nephrol. 1999 May;51(5):290-5.

Hypertension is associated with hyperlipidemia, coronary heart disease and chronic graft failure in kidney transplant recipients.

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1
Division of Nephrology, Medical Clinic IV, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hypertension is a common concomitant condition in renal transplant recipients. There is accumulating evidence that this disorder is an important risk factor for chronic renal graft failure and other cardiovascular complications in these patients.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

The current retrospective study in 330 patients treated with cyclosporin or azathioprin covered 5 years and aimed to further characterize the interrelation between hypertension and renal graft failure. Furthermore, the association of hypertension with hyperlipidemia and the prevalence of coronary heart disease was evaluated.

RESULTS:

Altogether, before transplantation 182 patients were normotensive (no antihypertensive medication except diuretics) and 105 were hypertensive (blood pressure > 160/95 mmHg or patients requiring antihypertensive medication); for the remaining 43 patients no data were available. After transplantation the prevalence of hypertension in the cyclosporin group was 71, 76 and 70% after 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. The respective numbers for the azathioprin group were 60, 59 and 58%. Hypertension was associated with graft dysfunction both in cyclosporin- and azathioprin-treated patients. Hyperlipidemia (cholesterol, triglycerides) was more severe in hypertensive than in normotensive patients. The prevalence for hypertension was higher in patients with coronary artery disease than in patients without the disease.

CONCLUSION:

The results further support the view that hypertension may be a risk factor for the development of chronic renal graft failure and coronary artery disease in this population. Furthermore, the association of hypertension with hyperlipidemia hints to an unfavorable accumulation of renal and cardiovascular risk factors in a large number of renal allograft recipients.

PMID:
10363629
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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