Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Virology. 1999 May 25;258(1):108-17.

Nascent flavivirus RNA colocalized in situ with double-stranded RNA in stable replication complexes.

Author information

1
Sir Albert Sakzewski Virus Research Centre, Royal Children's Hospital, Herston, 4029, Australia. e.westaway@mailbox.up.edu.au

Abstract

Incorporation of bromouridine (BrU) into viral RNA in Kunjin virus-infected Vero cells treated with actinomycin D was monitored in situ by immunofluorescence using antibodies reactive with Br-RNA. The results showed unequivocally that nascent viral RNA was located focally in the same subcellular site as dsRNA, the putative template for flavivirus RNA synthesis. When cells were labeled with BrU for 15 min, the estimated cycle period for RNA synthesis, the nascent Br-RNA was not digested in permeabilized cells by RNase A under high-salt conditions, in accord with our original model of flavivirus RNA synthesis (Chu, P. W. G., and Westaway, E. G., Virology 140, 68-79, 1985). The model assumes that there is on average only one nascent strand per template, which remains bound until displaced during the next cycle of RNA synthesis. The replicase complex located by BrU incorporation in the identified foci was stable, remaining active in incorporating BrU or [32P]orthophosphate in viral RNA after complete inhibition of protein synthesis in cycloheximide-treated cells. These results are in accord with our proposal that dsRNA detected in foci previously located by immunofluorescence or by immunogold labeling of induced vesicle packets is functioning as the true replicative intermediate (Westaway et al., J. Virol. 71, 6650-6661, 1997; Mackenzie et al., Virology 245, 203-215, 1998). Implications are that the replicase complex is able to recycle in the same membrane site in the absence of continuing protein synthesis and that possibly apart from uncleaved NS3-NS4A, it has no requirement for a polyprotein precursor late in infection.

PMID:
10329573
DOI:
10.1006/viro.1999.9683
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center