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Ophthalmology. 1999 May;106(5):1030-4.

Long-term outcome of aqueous shunt surgery in ten patients with iridocorneal endothelial syndrome.

Author information

1
Glaucoma Service, University of Florida, Jacksonville, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report the long-term outcome of ten patients with iridocorneal endothelial (ICE) syndrome who underwent aqueous shunt surgery for uncontrolled glaucoma.

DESIGN:

Noncomparative, retrospective case series.

PARTICIPANTS:

The authors reviewed charts of ten patients with ICE syndrome-related glaucoma who underwent aqueous shunt surgery at one institution between 1987 and 1996.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Intraocular pressure (IOP), number of glaucoma medications, and further surgical interventions were measured.

RESULTS:

With a median follow-up of 55 months, four eyes had adequate IOP control (IOP <21 mm Hg) with one or two medications after the initial aqueous shunt surgery. An additional three eyes achieved adequate IOP control after one or more tube repositionings or revisions of the initial aqueous shunt. In this series, the aqueous shunt surgery most often failed because of blocking of the tube ostium by iris, ICE membrane, or membrane-induced tube migration.

CONCLUSION:

Aqueous shunt surgery appears to be an effective method for IOP lowering in some eyes with ICE syndrome-related glaucoma when medical treatment or conventional filtration surgeries fail, but additional glaucoma procedures and/or aqueous shunt revisions and tube repositionings are not uncommon.

PMID:
10328409
DOI:
10.1016/S0161-6420(99)00529-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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