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J Heart Lung Transplant. 1999 Mar;18(3):269-74.

Beta-blocker treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy with congestive heart failure in children: a multi-institutional experience.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Primary Children's Medical Center and the University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84113, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dilated cardiomyopathy is the primary indication for heart transplantation in children beyond infancy. Although beta-blockers improve symptoms, ejection fraction, and survival in adults with congestive heart failure, little is known of their effects in children.

METHODS:

This study reviews our pediatric experience with the beta-blocker, metoprolol, at 3 institutions. We gave metoprolol to 15 children, age 8.6 +/- 1.3 years (range 2.5 to 15 years), with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 9), anthracycline cardiomyopathy (n = 3), and Duchenne muscular dystrophy cardiomyopathy, postmyocarditis cardiomyopathy, and post-surgical cardiomyopathy (n = 1 each). All had been treated with conventional medications (digoxin, diuretics, and ACE inhibitors) for 22.5 +/- 9 months before starting metoprolol. Metoprolol was started at 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg/ dose given twice daily and slowly increased over a period of weeks to a dose of 1.1 +/- 0.1 mg/kg/day (range 0.5 to 2.3 mg/kg/day).

RESULTS:

Between the time point of stabilization on conventional medications and the initiation of metoprolol therapy, there was no significant change in fractional shortening (13.1 +/- 1.2% vs 15.0 +/- 1.2%) or ejection fraction (25.6 +/- 2.1% vs 27.0 +/- 3.4%). However, after metoprolol therapy for 23.2 +/- 7 months, there was a significant increase in fractional shortening(23.3 +/- 2.6%) and ejection fraction (41.1 +/- 4.3%) (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Metoprolol improves ventricular function in some children with dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Further study is warranted to better define which children may benefit most from beta-blocker therapy and which beta-blockers are most efficacious.

PMID:
10328154
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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