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Ann Thorac Surg. 1999 Apr;67(4):1104-10.

601 octogenarians undergoing cardiac surgery: outcome and comparison with younger age groups.

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1
Joseph B. Whitehead Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cardiac valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) are being applied with increasing frequency in patients 80 years of age and older.

METHODS:

Six hundred one consecutive patients older than 80 years, undergoing cardiac surgery between 1976 and 1994 (CABG with saphenous vein graft, 329 [54.7%]; CABG with left internal mammary artery, 101 [16.8%]; CABG + valve, 80 [13.3%]; isolated aortic valve replacement, 71 [11.8%]; isolated mitral valve replacement, 18 [3.0%]), were studied retrospectively to assess short- and long-term survival. They were compared with 11,386 patients aged 60 to 69 years and 5,698 patients aged 70 to 79 years undergoing similar procedures during the same time interval.

RESULTS:

In comparison with patients 60 to 69 years old, more octogenarians were women (44.4% versus 25.6%, p<0.0001), had class IV angina (54.1% versus 38.9%, p<0.0001), and had congestive heart failure class IV (4.9% versus 3.0%, p = 0.0001). In-hospital death rates (9.1% versus 3.4%, p<0.0001) and stroke (5.7% versus 2.6%, p<0.0001) reflected these adverse clinical risk factors. However, Q-wave infarction tended to be less frequent (1.5% versus 2.6%, p = 0.102). Interestingly, hospital mortality (9.1% versus 6.7%, p = 0.028) was only slightly increased, and stroke (5.7% versus 4.7%, p = 0.286) was not more common in octogenarians than in patients 70 to 79 years old. Late-survival curves have similar slopes for the first 5 years in all clinical subgroups. However, after 5 years there is a more rapid decline in octogenarians than in younger age groups. Median 5-year survival was 55% for patients older than 80 years, 69% for patients 70 to 79 years, and 81% for patients 60 to 69 years old.

CONCLUSIONS:

When appropriately applied in selected octogenarians, cardiac surgery can be performed with acceptable mortality and excellent 5-year survival.

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PMID:
10320258
DOI:
10.1016/s0003-4975(99)00154-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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