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J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 1999 May;12(5):308-13.

Pulsed tissue Doppler imaging of left ventricular systolic and diastolic wall motion velocities to evaluate differences between long and short axes in healthy subjects.

Author information

1
Second Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan.

Abstract

Our objective was to evaluate in healthy subjects the left ventricular (LV) wall motion velocities along the long and short axes by means of pulsed tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) to clarify the differences in the LV systolic and diastolic function between both axes. Wall motion velocities were recorded at the mid-wall portion of the middle site of the LV posterior wall in the parasternal long-axis view, and at the subendocardial portion of the middle site of the LV posterior wall in the apical long-axis view by pulsed TDI in 35 healthy subjects (mean age 26 +/- 10 years, mean heart rate 72 +/- 7 bpm). In all subjects, the LV pressure curve, its first derivative (dP/dt), the LV wall motion velocity, the phonocardiogram, and the electrocardiogram were simultaneously recorded. The systolic wave of the LV posterior wall motion velocity exhibited 2 peaks: the first and second systolic waves (Swl and Sw2, respectively). The diastolic wave also exhibited 2 peaks, the early diastolic and atrial systolic waves. The Swl along the long axis was greater than either the Sw1 and Sw2 along the short axis or the Sw2 along the long axis. The peak Sw1 along the long axis coincided with the peak dP/dt and was slightly earlier than the peak Swl along the short axis. The onset of Sw1 along the long axis coincided with the onset of the first heart sound. The Sw2 along the short axis was greater than that along the long axis. The early diastolic wave along the short axis was greater than that along the long axis, whereas the atrial systolic wave along the long axis was greater than that along the short axis. Thus, in healthy subjects, shortening of the longitudinal fibers predominated over that of the circumferential fibers during early systole, whereas shortening of the circumferential fibers predominated over the longitudinal fibers during the ejection phase. During diastole, the circumferential fibers predominated in the LV wall expansion at early diastole, whereas the longitudinal fibers predominated at atrial systole. In conclusion, pulsed TDI provided information that is useful in understanding the characteristics of LV wall motion along the long and short axes.

PMID:
10231616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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