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J Exp Med. 1999 May 3;189(9):1497-506.

Role of the scavenger receptor MARCO in alveolar macrophage binding of unopsonized environmental particles.

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1
Physiology Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Alveolar macrophages (AMs) avidly bind and ingest unopsonized environmental particles and bacteria through scavenger-type receptors (SRs). AMs from mice with a genetic deletion of the major macrophage SR (types AI and AII; SR-/-) showed no decrease in particle binding compared with SR+/+ mice, suggesting that other SRs are involved. To identify these receptors, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb), PAL-1, that inhibits hamster AM binding of unopsonized particles (TiO2, Fe2O3, and latex beads; 66 +/- 5, 77 +/- 2, and 85 +/- 2% inhibition, respectively, measured by flow cytometry). This antibody identifies a protein of approximately 70 kD on the AM surface (immunoprecipitation) that is expressed by AMs and other macrophages in situ. A cDNA clone encoding the mAb PAL-1-reactive protein isolated by means of COS cell expression was found to be 84 and 77% homologous to mouse and human scavenger receptor MARCO mRNA, respectively. Transfection of COS cells with MARCO cDNA conferred mAb-inhibitable TiO2 binding. Hamster MARCO also mediates AM binding of unopsonized bacteria (67 +/- 5 and 47 +/- 4% inhibition of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus binding by mAb PAL-1). A polyclonal antibody to human MARCO identified the expected approximately 70-kD band on Western blots of lysates of normal bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells (>90% AMs) and showed strong immunolabeling of human AMs in BAL cytocentrifuge preparations and within lung tissue specimens. In normal mouse AMs, the anti-MARCO mAb ED31 also showed immunoreactivity and inhibited binding of unopsonized particles (e.g., TiO2 approximately 40%) and bacteria. The novel function of binding unopsonized environmental dusts and pathogens suggests an important role for MARCO in the lungs' response to inhaled particles.

PMID:
10224290
PMCID:
PMC2193067
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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