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Exp Neurol. 1999 May;157(1):96-105.

Calcium influx and activation of calpain I mediate acute reactive gliosis in injured spinal cord.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

Abstract

Buffering extracellular pH at the site of a spinal cord crush-injury may stimulate axonal regeneration in rats (1; Guth et al., Exp. Neurol. 88: 44-55, 1985). We demonstrated in cultured astrocytes that acidic pH initiates a rapid increase in immunoreactivity for GFAP (GFAP-IR), a hallmark of reactive gliosis (2; Oh et al., Glia 13: 319-322, 1995). We extended these studies by investigating the effects of certain treatments on reactive gliosis developing in situ in a rat spinal cord injury model. A significant reactive gliosis was observed within 2 days of cord lesion in untreated crush or vehicle-treated, crush control animals as evidenced by increased GFAP-IR and hypertrophy of astrocytes. By contrast, infusion of Pipes buffer (pH 7.4) into the lesion site significantly reduced this increase. The increased GFAP-IR appeared to be linked to Ca2+ influx since infusion of a blocker of L-type calcium channels, nifedipine, reduced the ensuing reactive gliosis significantly. While Ca2+ modulates many signaling pathways within cells, its effect on reactive gliosis appeared to result from an activation of calpain I. Calpain inhibitor I, a selective inhibitor of mu-calpain, also significantly reduced reactive gliosis. However, calpain inhibitor II, a close structural analog which blocks m-calpain, had no salutary effect. We suggest, therefore, that the initial reactive gliosis seen in vivo may result from the activation of a neutral, Ca2+-dependent protease, calpain I, through calcium influx.

PMID:
10222112
DOI:
10.1006/exnr.1999.7041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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