Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 1999 Apr;17(4):326-33.

Cardiovascular and catecholamine responses during endovascular and conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

Author information

1
University Department of Anaesthesia, Leicester Royal Infirmary, U.K.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare changes in plasma catecholamines, acid-base status and cardiovascular dynamics in patients undergoing endovascular or conventional infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair under standard general anaesthesia.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

MATERIALS:

30 patients scheduled for elective infrarenal AAA repair.

METHODS:

Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations, acid-base status and cardiovascular measurement were compared before surgery, and 5 min after aortic clamping and clamp release (conventional group) or occlusion and release (endovascular group) in patients undergoing endovascular (n = 15) or conventional AAA repair (n = 15).

RESULTS:

Arterial pH (p < 0.005) and base deficit (p < 0.05) increased, and plasma bicarbonate decreased (p < 0.005) during aortic cross-clamping in the conventional group. pH decreased further (p < 0.005), and base deficit and pCO2 increased (both p < 0.005) after clamp release. These changes were significantly greater than during endovascular repair, in whom within-group changes were not statistically significant. Values were similar in the two groups 30 min after reperfusion. Plasma epinephrine concentrations increased during conventional surgery (p < 0.05) and were greater than in the endovascular group (p < 0.05). Plasma norepinephrine concentrations increased during surgery in both groups but the changes were not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Plasma catecholamine concentrations, changes in cardiovascular variables and acid-base status were increased during conventional compared with endovascular AAA repair.

PMID:
10204055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center