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Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Mar;28(3):582-6.

Relative bradycardia is not a feature of enteric fever in children.

Author information

1
University of Western Australia, Department of Medicine, Fremantle Hospital, Australia. tdavis@cyllene.uwa.edu.au

Abstract

We investigated pulse-temperature relationships in 66 children with enteric fever (group 1) and in 76 with other infections (group 2). Group 1 children were older than group 2 children (mean age +/- SD, 91 +/- 36 vs. 66 +/- 32 months, respectively; P < .001) and had mean oral temperatures +/- SD similar to those of group 2 children (38.3 +/- 1.0 vs. 38.3 +/- 0.9 degrees C, respectively; P > .2); however, group 1 children had lower mean baseline pulse rates +/- SD than did group 2 children (119 +/- 25 vs. 127 +/- 28 beats/min, respectively; P < .001). In a multiple linear regression model, pulse rate was independently associated with age (inversely; P < .001) and oral temperature (positively; P < .006) but not with diagnostic group or gender (P > .5). After adjustment of the mean initial pulse rate +/- SD to age of 72 months, there was no difference between group 1 and group 2 children (126 +/- 24 vs. 126 +/- 20 beats/min, respectively; P > .5). From 4 to 72 hours after commencement of treatment, the mean oral temperature in group 1 patients was approximately 0.3 degrees C higher than that in group 2 patients, and the age-adjusted pulse rate was 5 beats/min higher in group 1 children than in group 2 children. These data suggest that relative bradycardia is not characteristic of enteric fever in children.

PMID:
10194082
DOI:
10.1086/515143
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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