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Am J Health Promot. 1994 Jan-Feb;8(3):202-15.

Preventing adolescent drug abuse and high school dropout through an intensive school-based social network development program.

Author information

1
Psychosocial Nursing Department, University of Washington, Seattle 98195.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The hypothesis tested was that experimental subjects, relative to controls, would demonstrate significant increases in school performance and decreases in drug involvement at program exit (5 months) and at follow-up (10 months).

DESIGN:

A two-group, repeated-measures, intervention trial was the design used.

SETTING:

The study involved four urban Northwest high schools.

SUBJECTS:

Participants included 259 youth at high risk of potential school dropout, 101 in the experimental group and 158 in the control group.

INTERVENTION:

The Personal Growth Class experimental condition was a one-semester, five-month elective course taken as one of five or six regular classes. It had a 1:12 teacher-student ratio, and integrated group support and life-skills training interventions. The control condition included a regular school schedule.

MEASURES:

School performance measures (semester GPA, class absences) came from school records. Drug use progression, drug control, and adverse consequences were measured by the Drug Involvement Scale for Adolescents. Self-esteem, school bonding, and deviant peer bonding were measured using the High School Questionnaire: Inventory of Experiences. All multi-item scales had acceptable reliability and validity.

RESULTS:

As predicted, trend analyses revealed significantly different patterns of change over time between groups in drug control problems and consequences; in GPA (but not attendance); and in self-esteem, deviant peer bonding, and school bonding. The program appeared to stem the progression of drug use, but group differences only approached significance.

CONCLUSION:

Program efficacy was demonstrated particularly for decreasing drug control problems and consequences; increasing GPA and school bonding; and desired changes in self-esteem and deviant peer bonding. Program effects on progression of drug use were less definitive.

PMID:
10172017
DOI:
10.4278/0890-1171-8.3.202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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