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Am J Health Promot. 1992 Jul-Aug;6(6):437-42.

Relationship between serum cholesterol levels and television viewing in 11,947 employed adults.

Author information

1
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia among high-, moderate-, and low-duration television viewers. The confounding effects of age, gender, income, body fat percentage, weekly exercise duration, and smoking were also examined.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional or correlational design was employed. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios were used to estimate risk of the television viewers regarding hypercholesterolemia.

SETTING:

Participants were employees of over 55 corporations that had their employees screened as part of the ongoing risk-management program of Health Advancement Services (HAS), Inc.

SUBJECTS:

Subjects were 11,947 employed adults. About 85% of the subjects eligible for participation completed the screenings and were used in the study.

MEASURES:

Serum cholesterol was assessed in a certified lab, and lifestyle information, including television viewing habits, was collected via a written questionnaire. Body fat was measured using skinfolds from three body sites.

RESULTS:

High-duration television viewers were almost two times more likely to suffer from hypercholesterolemia as infrequent viewers, with and without control of multiple confounding factors. Moderate-duration viewers were at 1.5 times the risk of hypercholesterolemia compared to infrequent viewers. Neither television group was at greater risk of moderately elevated cholesterol levels (200-239) compared to the infrequent viewers with all of the potential confounders controlled.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cause-and-effect conclusions are not warranted; however, this study coupled with other investigations shows that excessive television viewing may be an important lifestyle factor linked to decreased health and functioning.

PMID:
10148720
DOI:
10.4278/0890-1171-6.6.437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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