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Am J Health Promot. 1992 Nov-Dec;7(2):110-7.

Community activation and health promotion: identification of key organizations.

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1
Center for Health Studies, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Seattle, Washington 98101.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study is to identify the kinds of community organizations community leaders consider important for community health promotion efforts.

DESIGN:

Key informants were identified by reputational sampling of organizations relevant to community health promotion. Key informants were asked to list organizations they considered important for community health promotion. Differences in identified organizations were compared across informants from seven urban, five suburban, seven rural, and three Native American communities, with significance evaluated by chi-square tests.

SETTING:

This survey was conducted in 22 Western U.S. communities comprising the intervention and control communities of the Community Health Promotion Grants Program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation.

SUBJECTS:

Key informants (N = 184) from community organizations, identified using a reputational sampling technique beginning with the health department, were interviewed by telephone.

MEASURES:

Key informants listed organizations considered important for community health promotion in five areas: adolescent pregnancy, substance abuse, tobacco use, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

RESULTS:

Informants frequently identified the health department (mentioned by 78% of informants overall), schools (72%), governmental agencies (55%), hospitals (47%), health clinics (42%), churches (33%), and newspapers (32%) as important. Organizations more prominent in urban and suburban areas than in rural and Native American areas included television stations, health-related private nonprofit organizations, substance abuse treatment centers, and colleges. Private physicians were frequently identified in rural areas (44% of informants).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
10148715
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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