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Arch Biochem Biophys. 1999 Apr 1;364(1):67-74.

Effects of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids on the synthesis and distribution of aminophospholipids during neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells.

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabedori, Nagoya, Mizuhoku, 467-8603, Japan. aikemoto@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

Abstract

We have shown previously that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) promotes and arachidonic acid (AA) suppresses neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) and that incorporation of [3H]ethanolamine into phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is suppressed in PC12 cells by AA while DHA has no effect. In the present study, the effects of these fatty acids on PE synthesis via decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), another pathway of PE synthesis, and distribution of aminophospholipids were examined. Incorporation of [3H]serine into PS and PE was elevated in the course of NGF-induced differentiation and was further stimulated significantly by DHA, but not by AA. [3H]Ethanolamine uptake by PC12 cells was significantly suppressed by AA but not by DHA while these fatty acids did not affect [3H]serine uptake, indicating that the suppression by AA of [3H]ethanolamine incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine is attributable, at least in part, to a reduction in [3H]ethanolamine uptake. The distribution of PE in the outer leaflet of plasma membrane decreased during differentiation, which is known to be accompanied by an increase in the surface area of plasma membrane. Supplementation of PC12 cells with DHA or AA did not affect the distribution of aminophospholipids. Thus, DHA and AA affected aminophospholipid synthesis and neurite outgrowth differently, but not the transport and distribution of aminophospholipids, while the PE concentration in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane decreased in association with morphological changes in PC12 cells induced by NGF.

PMID:
10087166
DOI:
10.1006/abbi.1999.1110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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