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Plant Mol Biol. 1999 Jan;39(2):361-72.

Regulation of biosynthesis and cellular localization of Sp32 annexins in tobacco BY2 cells.

Author information

1
Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, C.N.R.S., Université Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France.

Abstract

Annexins interact in a calcium-dependent manner with membrane phospholipids. Although their exact function is not known, annexins have been proposed to be involved in a variety of cellular processes. To determine whether plant annexins are implicated in cell division, we have isolated cDNAs encoding annexin from TBY2 cells. Based on sequence analysis, these cDNAs fall into two families, differing mainly by deletions or insertions in their 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions. The two annexins Ntp32.1 and Ntp32.2 encoded by these cDNAs are homologous to p32 from bell pepper (Cap32.1): we propose that these Solanaceae annexins constitute a distinct type which we call Sp32 annexins. There are two genes (Ntan.1 and Ntan.2) derived from the separate progenitor species of Nicotiana tabacum and analysis of Southern blots is consistent with the presence of these two genes. We show that Sp32 transcript amounts are developmentally modulated in tobacco plants: RNA levels are highest in growing and dividing tissues. Sp32 annexin gene expression is also regulated in TBY2 cultured cells: transcripts and proteins are detected only in exponentially growing cells. In synchronized TBY2 cells, Sp32 annexin transcripts are expressed at the G2/M transition, in the M phase and at the G1/S transition. These results are the first evidence that the expression of plant annexins is modulated during the cell cycle. The Sp32 annexin proteins accumulate during the cell cycle and peak at the end of mitosis. Immunolocalization shows that the majority of Sp32 annexins is present in intercellular junctions, forming a ring structure under the plasma membrane. Since annexins are known to bind secretory vesicles during exocytosis, their localization at cell junctions suggests that annexins could be involved in cell wall maturation.

PMID:
10080701
DOI:
10.1023/a:1006199814795
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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