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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1999 Mar 16;256(2):429-35.

Human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection requires pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein-coupled signalling and mediates cAMP downregulation.

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1
Department of Immunology, St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, EC1A 7BE, United Kingdom. christine_guntermann@macmailgw.dfci.harvard.edu

Abstract

The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) utilises CD4 and certain beta-chemokine receptors, mainly CCR-5 and CXCR4, for attachment and virus entry into T-lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. CD4 and beta-chemokine receptors participate in intracellular signalling via protein tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled signalling. The factors which influence HIV-1 replication and the intracellular signalling mechanisms elicited by the virus are not well understood. In this study, it was demonstrated that exposure of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) to a T-cell tropic strain of HIV-1 evokes signal(s) which results in downregulation of intracellular cAMP. In addition, pre-incubation of PBLs with the Gi-protein inhibitor Pertussis toxin mediated a significant inhibition of HIV-1 replication. These data strongly suggest that HIV-1 employs CD4 receptors and Gi-coupled proteins for entry into target cells and that productive HIV-1 infection is dependent on an active signalling event.

PMID:
10079202
DOI:
10.1006/bbrc.1999.0333
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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