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J Clin Invest. 1999 Mar;103(5):627-35.

Angiotensin II plays a pathogenic role in immune-mediated renal injury in mice.

Author information

1
Discovery Research Laboratory, Tanabe seiyaku Co., Ltd., Kashima, Osaka 532-8505, Japan.

Abstract

Several lines of evidence show the importance of angiotensin II (AII) in renal injuries, especially when hemodynamic abnormalities are involved. To elucidate the role of AII in immune-mediated renal injury, we studied anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in AII type 1a receptor (AT1a)-deficient homozygous (AT1a-/-) and wild-type (AT1a+/+) mice. A transient activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was observed in both groups of mice at around day 1. A renal expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) was transiently induced at six hours in both groups, which was then downregulated at day 1. In the AT1a+/+ mice, after RAS activation, the glomerular expression of MCP-1 was exacerbated at days 7 and 14. Thereafter, severe proteinuria developed, and the renal expressions of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and collagen type I increased, resulting in severe glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. In contrast, glomerular expression of MCP-1, proteinuria, and tissue damage were markedly ameliorated in the AT1a-/- mice. Because this amelioration is likely due to the lack of AT1a, we can conclude that AII action, mediated by AT1a, plays a pathogenic role in anti-GBM nephritis, in which AII may contribute to the exacerbation of glomerular MCP-1 expression. These results suggest the involvement of AII in immune-mediated renal injuries.

PMID:
10074479
PMCID:
PMC408115
DOI:
10.1172/JCI2454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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