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Annu Rev Med. 1999;50:507-29.

Dendritic cell vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 94305, USA. jtimmer@leland.stanford.edu

Abstract

Human tumors express a number of protein antigens that can be recognized by T cells, thus providing potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DCs) are rare leukocytes that are uniquely potent in their ability to present antigens to T cells, and this property has prompted their recent application to therapeutic cancer vaccines. Isolated DCs loaded with tumor antigen ex vivo and administered as a cellular vaccine have been found to induce protective and therapeutic anti-tumor immunity in experimental animals. In pilot clinical trials of DC vaccination for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and melanoma, induction of anti-tumor immune responses and tumor regressions have been observed. Additional trials of DC vaccination for a variety of human cancers are under way, and methods for targeting tumor antigens to DCs in vivo are also being explored. Exploitation of the antigen-presenting properties of DCs thus offers promise for the development of effective cancer immunotherapies.

PMID:
10073291
DOI:
10.1146/annurev.med.50.1.507
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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