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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1999 Mar 5;256(1):33-40.

G protein-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by two dopamine D2 receptors.

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1
Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, 120-752, South Korea.

Abstract

Two isoforms of dopamine D2 receptor, D2L (long) and D2S (short), differ by the insertion of 29 amino acids specific to D2L within the putative third intracellular loop of the receptor, which appears to be important in selectivity for G-protein coupling. We have generated D2L- and D2S-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway was examined in these cells. Both D2L and D2S mediated a rapid and transient activation of MAPK with dominant activation of p42-kDa MAPK. Pertussis toxin treatment completely abrogated stimulation of MAPK mediated by D2L and D2S, demonstrating that both receptors couple to pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in this signaling. Stimulation of MAPK mediated by both D2L and D2S receptor was markedly attenuated by coexpression of the C-terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (betaARKct), which selectively inhibits Gbetagamma-mediated signal transduction. Further analysis of D2L- and D2S-mediated MAPK activation demonstrated that D2L-mediated MAPK activation was not significantly affected by PKC depletion or partially affected by genistein. In contrast, D2S-mediated MAPK activation was potentially inhibited by PKC depletion and genistein was capable of completely inhibiting D2S-mediated MAPK activation. Together, these results suggest that D2L- and D2S-mediated MAPK activation is predominantly Gbetagamma subunit-mediated signaling and that protein kinase C and tyrosine phosphorylations are involved in these signaling pathways.

PMID:
10066418
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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