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Mutat Res. 1999 Mar 8;424(1-2):263-74.

Comparison of DNA adduct levels associated with exogenous and endogenous exposures in human pancreas in relation to metabolic genotype.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Epidemiology, National Center for Toxicological Research (HFT-100), 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079, USA. pthompson@nctr.fda.gov

Abstract

Recently, we examined normal human pancreas tissue for DNA adducts derived from either exogenous chemical exposure and/or endogenous agents. In an effort to explain the different types and levels of DNA adducts formed in the context of individual susceptibility to cancer, we have focused on gene-environment interactions. Here, we report on the levels of hydrophobic aromatic amines (AAs), specifically those derived from 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), and DNA adducts associated with oxidative stress in human pancreas. Although these adducts have been reported in several human tissues by different laboratories, a comparison of the levels of these adducts in the same tissue samples has not been performed. Using the same DNA, the genotypes were determined for N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1), the glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, GSTP1, GSTT1, and NAD(P)H quinone reductase-1 (NQO1) as possible modulators of adduct levels because their gene products are involved in the detoxification of AAs, lipid peroxidation products and in redox cycling. These results indicate that ABP-DNA adducts, malondialdehyde-DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) adducts are present at similar levels. Of the metabolic genotypes examined, the presence of ABP-DNA adducts was strongly associated with the putative slow NAT1*4/*4 genotype, suggesting a role for this pathway in ABP detoxification.

PMID:
10064866
DOI:
10.1016/s0027-5107(99)00024-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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